Processors: Intel and AMD CPUs

Processor (CPU) specifications explained

You should be able to find the specifications of any make/model of CPU by conducting a web search using the make model. Here are the specifications of an AMD processor:

AMD Phenom II X2 [dual-core] 545 3GHz Socket AM3 – L1, L2, L3 6MB caches
Product Description –
Revision – C2 Core Speed (MHz) – 3000 [3.0GHz]
Voltages – 0.875-1.425V
Max Temps (C) – 70 Wattage – 80W
L1 Cache Size (KB) – 128
L2 Cache Size (KB) – 512
L3 Cache Size (KB) – 6144 [6MB]
Fabrication process – 45nm
Processor Socket – AM3

Cache (pronounced as cash, plural cashes) is implemented differently in AMD and Intel’s processors. Since system RAM memory works far more slowly than the processor, processors store information in buffers called caches that are kept filled so that they can can keep themselves fed with data at full speed. The amount and type of cache affects a processor’s performance dramatically. If the three types of cache were disabled, the processor’s performance would fall off very markedly.

Intel’s Sandy Bridge processors (Core i3, i5, i7, using socket LGA1155) have up to four cores each, with each core having its own Level 1 and Level 2 cache, with all of the cores sharing the Level 3 cache. AMD’s Bulldozer (FX) processors use modules, with each module containing two processor cores. Each of the cores has its own Level 1 cache and the two cores in each module share 2MB of Level 2 cache. The modules all share the Level 3 cache.

CPU cache – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU_cache

Does Cache Size Really Boost Performance? –

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/cache-size-matter,1709.html

All of the processors made by AMD and Intel use a motherboard that has either an AMD-based or Intel-based socket type. The CPU socket types are discussed the Processor Sockets section of this website.

Note well that you must make sure that any motherboard you intend to buy to upgrade or build a PC already supports the processor you want. The motherboard manufacturer’s website should provide that information. Don’t buy a motherboard that requires a BIOS/EUFI update in order to support your chosen model of processor, because you’ll need to install a processor that is currently compatible with the motherboard in order to install the update.

NEXT PAGEThe manufacturing fabrication process measured in nanometers (nm)

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